Germany plans construction of 50 hydrogen fuel stations by 2015

The Linde Hydrogen Center

The German Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Development has signed a joint Letter of Intent with several industry partners to expand the network of fuelling stations from current 15 stations across the country. The letter forms part of the National Innovation Programme for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology (NIP), in which Germany’s federal government will work with its partners; Air Liquide, Air Products, Daimler, Linde and Total Germany to expand the public network.

The German government’s own NOW GmbH (National Organisation for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology) will coordinate the construction of the filling stations. The network of hydrogen filling stations accompanies the introduction of fuel cell vehicles that the automobile industry has announced for 2014/15.

Hydrogen Fueling

Partner, Daimler plans to be the first carmaker to start full commercial production of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, with plans to launch the Mercedes-Benz B-Class F-Cell by 2014.

Dr. Peter Ramsauer, Federal Minister of Transport, Building and Urban Development, said: “Electric vehicles equipped with hydrogen fuel cells generate no harmful emissions. They also have a high range and can be refueled within minutes. To facilitate their introduction to the market, we need a network of filling stations that covers the major metropolitan areas and connects them to each other. We are therefore partnering with the private industry to setup a total of 50 hydrogen filling stations in Germany by the year 2015. By doing so, we create the basis for a demand-driven infrastructure for refueling hydrogen vehicles.”


Prof. Thomas Weber, Member of the Board of Management of Daimler AG, responsible for Group Research and Mercedes-Benz Cars Development: “Electric vehicles equipped with a battery and fuel cell will make a considerable contribution to sustainable mobility in the future. However, the success of fuel cell technology depends crucially on certain conditions being in place, such as the availability of a nationwide hydrogen infrastructure.”

Source – Petroleum Plaza

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The War to Build America’s First Offshore Wind Farm

cape wind offshore

Jim Gordon has been pioneering the installation of the United States’ first offshore wind farm to be located off the coast of Cape Cod for over a decade now, and while the proposal is closer now to being started than ever before, Gordon is well aware that the fight is not over yet.

Cape Wind has been getting permits and the go-ahead from governments over the past two months, and the first of 130 wind turbines is soon to be installed, six miles off the coast in Nantucket Sound. But just as this milestone is within reach, the U.S. Congress has decided not to renew tax incentives for the wind power industry.

Opposed over the project’s lengthy history by such luminaries from across party lines as Senator Edward M. Kennedy and petroleum and coal magnate and GOP fundraiser William Koch, Gordon has had a long fight, and he’s expecting it to continue, thanks in large part to Koch’s efforts. So far, he has faced reviews by 17 government agencies, court challenges, and some very public outcry.

Gordon was recently interviewed by Yale Environment 360, where he spoke about his decade-long fight to build the U.S.’s first offshore wind farm, why he thinks renewable energy developers will survive a boom in cheap natural gas, and why Cape Wind’s long struggle will ultimately benefit the clean energy sector.

“It was painful, it was costly, it was frustrating,” Gordon said. “But you know something, if it makes it easier for others after me, I take some pride in that. And I take some hope in that because America needs renewable energy.”

When asked whether the 10-year fight was over, Gordon replied:

I wouldn’t call it a fight, I would call it an epic battle. With every major energy or infrastructure project in New England you’re always going to have some opposition to it. People are resistant to change.

We were announcing a project that would produce over 75 percent of the Cape and islands’ electricity with zero pollutant emissions, zero water consumption and zero waste discharge — and most importantly harnessing an inexhaustible and abundant energy resource that’s ours, that’s not controlled by cartels overseas. We thought people would really be excited about it.

But we were surrounded by the wealthiest, most politically influential people in the United States, and a lot of them still are fighting this project.

For the rest of the interview, where Gordon discusses the ins and outs of Cape Wind, his own motivations, and why he thinks the battle will benefit the wind and renewable industries overall, click on over to Yale’s Enviornment 360.

Source: Clean Technica (http://s.tt/1aGRo)

Massive Solar Power Deal Being Made in San Antonio

“In a unique, first-of-its kind generation-to-manufacturing proposal, CPS Energy is entering into negotiations for a power purchase agreement from one of the nation’s largest solar projects,” CPS Energy wrote yesterday. “The project will mean new corporate headquarters and U.S. manufacturing operations for global companies in San Antonio.”

The solar project, offered by OCI Solar Power, is expected to:

  • have up to 400 megawatts (MW) of power capacity (which will be bought through a 25-year purchased power agreement)
  • create over 800 professional and technical jobs
  • result in over $1 billion of construction investment

Multiple solar manufacturing facilities in the San Antonio area to produce proven components of solar power plants” under the agreement.

“This proposal would diversify our energy sources in a manner that makes good business sense and meets our objectives. Our goal is to always provide our ratepayers safe, reliable and affordable energy, and wherever possible, bring additional value to our community,” said CPS Energy’s President and CEO Doyle Beneby (a top utility company CEO when it comes to solar). “As San Antonio becomes a central hub for solar development in the U.S., there is also a beneficial opportunity for other Texas based municipal utilities to achieve their renewable energy goals by becoming sites for parts of the project.”

The solar project is supposed to be built in phases over the next 5 years.

“In just a few short years, this initiative could help CPS Energy achieve our Vision 2020 goal of attaining 20 percent or 1,500 MW of renewable resources by the end of the decade. It’s a phenomenal opportunity that propels this utility to a leadership position for both wind and solar energy,” stated CPS Energy Board Chair Derrick Howard.

With this company relocating its headquarters to San Antonio due to CPS Energy’s work, the utility has now brought 7 clean energy companies to the area. The utility announced last June that it intends to become “a New Energy Economy hub” — looks like it is sincere about that.

Here’s a list of some of CPS Energy’s additional clean energy stats:

  • 14-MW Blue Wing solar farm launched in 2009, largest solar project in Texas
  • 30 MW more under contract with Sun Edison
  • 1059 MW of wind energy under contract

Source: CPS Energy | Blue Wind Solar Project image via CPS Energy YouTube video

Source: Clean Technica (http://s.tt/15duk)